I can’t write — my protagonist has the flu.

I bet you’ve never seen that writing excuse before.  🙂

I don’t mean it as an excuse, though.  He really does have the flu.  Right now, early January, 2015.  But it isn’t quite influenza; it’s the infamous and mysterious “rare dragon disease.”  Not that he knows that.

(No dragons were involved in the making of this retrovirus.  Just so you know.)

Besides, I’ve been writing anyway.  Now that one of the things this character was so afraid of is out of the way (and not nearly the problem he expected it to be), I can write what happens afterward more easily.  *shakes head*  It shouldn’t be easy — there’s a lot of not much, and then the lead-up to what happened in Utah.  Need to figure out character motivation for the lead-up (why does he leave?), which means I need to discuss this part of the story with my clone.

The character who created the retrovirus, by the way… I know why he did it, and I know how he did it, and — Murphy help me! — I even know a little bit about what he will do/did soon afterward.  So if my clone finds writing about the aftermath of a recent apocalypse a little too cheerful for his tastes, I can suggest that he write the right-now events for the same viewpoint character.

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About Thomas Weaver

I’m a writer and editor who got into professional editing almost by accident years ago when a friend from university needed someone to copyedit his screenplay about giant stompy robots (mecha). Having discovered that I greatly enjoy this kind of work, I’ve been putting my uncanny knack for grammar and punctuation, along with an eclectic mental collection of facts, to good use ever since as a Wielder of the Red Pen of Doom. I'm physically disabled, and for the past several years, I’ve lived with my smugly good-looking twin Paul, who writes military science fiction and refuses to talk about his military service because he can’t. Sometimes Paul and I collaborate on stories, and sometimes I just edit whatever he writes. It's worked out rather well so far. My list of non-writing-related jobs from the past includes librarian, art model, high school teacher, science lab gofer… Although I have no spouse or offspring to tell you about, I do have six cats. (The preferred term is "Insane Cat Gentleman.") I currently spend my time blogging, reading, editing, and fending off cats who like my desk better than my twin’s.
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4 Responses to I can’t write — my protagonist has the flu.

  1. Why didn’t I think of that one!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Some days I can’t write – my character has CFS, and is too tired. I understand. Most people don’t realize writers are actual humans.

    My challenge: making a very debilitating and limiting disease not the kiss of death to a story.

    Is your protagonist’s flu curable?

    Alicia

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, it wasn’t -exactly- the flu, but he’s been over the being-ill part since the middle of January. (It was actually a retrovirus engineered by an extra-dimensional madman… for this character’s own good, of course.) Now life goes on as usual for a little while.

      His author, on the other hand, has fibromyalgia, and that’s not going away any time soon.

      Like

      • I am so sorry his author isn’t well. I don’t have FM ( a lot of PWCs do), but the CFS is enough, thankyouverymuch.

        The only good thing about it is that we can write about illness with an added edge, and tell the world in a way it can understand (fiction) what it is to live like this. It is a disgrace that they have let these diseases go unexplained for over 30 years – and untreated.

        When I have ten seconds in a row to call my own (and the brain is actually functioning – that IS a requirement) after the days’ writing, I’ll go take your character’s temperature, see what he’s like.

        Liked by 1 person

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