‘Nothing to see here…,’ and why.

What you’ve been seeing here since the middle of August — or rather, not seeing — is me taking necessary (in)action to prevent burnout from getting worse. It’s the sort of burnout that’s apparently rather common for people of my nonstandard neurology. (I mean autistic, kids, not… the other ways in which my brain’s wiring doesn’t match the usual specifications.) My entire life, I’ve had this tendency to drop everything when I feel that I can’t get it all done, but this time I’m trying to just drop some of it, and only temporarily, because that seems as if it would work better. (Dropping nothing is not an option.) I just didn’t know why this happened. And apparently I’m still not supposed to know why it happens, but that’s a tirade for another day.

Sensory overload doesn’t mix well with chronic pain, either, and the pain I have throughout my body is only made worse with the sort of weather we’ve been having in this part of the country for months. (Sub-freezing temperatures in October! And then back up to “shirtsleeve weather” the next week…)

“Just make a list of everything that has to be done and then decide what tasks have top priority.” Yeah. As if it were that easy! I’m not a list-maker at the best of times, and executive functioning is one of the first things to go. Sometimes during burnout I can get stuff done if someone else figures out for me what to do, but not always. (And there’s no need for anyone to leave a nasty comment on this post and call me names or tell me what I’m doing wrong. Believe me, I’ve already said all of that — and worse — to myself.)


Anyway, I think I’m “back” now. (Wrote most of this post in little bits over the course of a few months — that’s how bad the burnout was.) Blogging to resume as normal… which is to say, frequent but just as weird as ever. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Thomas Weaver

For several years, I’ve been putting my uncanny knack for grammar and punctuation, along with an eclectic mental collection of facts, to good use as a Wielder of the Red Pen of Doom (editor). I'm physically disabled, and I currently live with my smugly good-looking twin Paul, who writes military science fiction and refuses to talk about his military service because he can’t. Sometimes Paul and I collaborate on stories, and sometimes I just edit whatever he writes. It's worked out rather well so far. My list of non-writing-related jobs from the past includes librarian, art model, high school teacher, science lab gofer… Although I have no spouse or offspring to tell you about, I do have six cats. (The preferred term is "Insane Cat Gentleman.") I currently spend my time blogging, reading, editing, and fending off cats who like my desk better than my twin’s.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to ‘Nothing to see here…,’ and why.

  1. The weirdness has been missed. I’m pleased it will return. Cheers

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Glad to see you’re back(ish?). My Fibromyalgia can relate to your weather woes and raising King Ben has taught me lots about the needs and stumbling blocks of autistic wiring.
    Looking forward to more kitty pics, horrible grammar and rants.
    🌻

    Liked by 1 person

  3. alicegristle says:

    Yeah, whenever possible, take care of yaself. Good to hear from you! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. So good to see you! I’m with you, my friend—so hard! Been going through something very similar for the past year and a half. It’s not quite over yet, but I feel myself starting to come back slowly (but surely). Give yourself a lot of patience, a lot of leeway; there’s no shame in what we’re going through 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I am really sorry you had to suffer through this.

    The weather has been awful this year. My kids didn’t get to trick-or-treat because of the foot of snow we had at Halloween, but we went to the park the day after Christmas because it was 50 degrees!

    Ignore what anyone says that doesn’t focus on you taking care of you.

    I don’t know anything about autism, and I won’t pretend I do, but I do know each person has to deal with burnout in their way. Going for a long run would NOT be my way, but I know people who run to relieve stress.

    Take care of yourself, and I am glad to have heard from you again.

    Liked by 1 person

Don't hold back -- tell me what you really think.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.